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49ers coaching staff: Bios on the new assistants

The San Francisco 49ers provided some basic bios on the new coaching staff. Here you go!

Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

The San Francisco 49ers announced the full coaching staff Monday afternoon, and in the press release they included bios for each of the assistants. I've posted them below, and you can read some more feature-y stuff on the new coaches over at 49ers.com.

Geep Chryst, 52, enters his fifth season with the 49ers and first as the team's offensive coordinator, having spent his first four years as the team's quarterbacks coach. With 27 seasons of coaching experience, including 22 years in the NFL, he joined the 49ers in 2011 after five years as the tight ends coach/offensive quality control for the Carolina Panthers. Chryst has played a significant role in the development of QB Colin Kaepernick, which was evident when he became the starter in Week 11 of the 2012 season and led the team to an appearance in Super Bowl XLVII. This past season under Chryst's tutelage, Kaepernick posted a career high in passing yards (3,369) and set the franchise record for rushing yards by a quarterback (639).

Prior to joining the Panthers in 2006, Chryst served as the Arizona Cardinals quarterbacks coach (2001-03) and San Diego Chargers offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach (1999-2000). He spent three seasons with the Cardinals, serving as the team's tight ends coach from 1996-97 before becoming the quarterbacks coach in 1998. Chryst began his NFL coaching career with the Chicago Bears in 1991 as the director of research/quality control, a position he held until 1995. He made his professional coaching debut with the Orlando Thunder (World League) in 1991, serving as the wide receivers/running backs coach. Chryst began his coaching career at University of Wisconsin-Platteville in 1987 before moving over to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in 1988. Chryst then spent two years at the University of Wyoming, serving as the offensive line coach in 1989 and the quarterbacks coach in 1990.

Ronald Curry, 35, enters his first season as the 49ers wide receivers coach after spending the first two seasons of his NFL coaching career as an offensive assistant with the team. Curry, a seven-year NFL veteran, played wide receiver for the Oakland Raiders from 2002-08. Originally drafted in the seventh round from the University of North Carolina, Curry played in 76 games (32 starts) and registered 193 receptions for 2,347 yards and 13 touchdowns for the Raiders.  Prior to joining the 49ers staff, Curry spent three years at Mooresville Christian Academy in Mooresville, NC, as the athletic director and head football coach.

Chris Foerster, 53, returns to San Francisco as the team's offensive line coach after spending the past five years with the Washington Redskins (2010-14) in the same role. A veteran of 33 seasons coaching at the collegiate and professional levels (23 in the NFL), he also served as the 49ers offensive line coach from 2008-09. From 2005-07, Foerster was the offensive line coach and assistant head coach for the Baltimore Ravens. Prior to joining the Ravens, he was the offensive coordinator for the Miami Dolphins (2004), tight ends coach for the Indianapolis Colts (2002-03) and offensive line coach for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1996-2001). Foerster also worked in the collegiate ranks, serving as the offensive line coach for the University of Minnesota (1992), assistant offensive line/special teams coach at Stanford University (1988-91) and offensive line coach for Colorado State (1983-87). He began his coaching career in 1982 as a graduate assistant at Colorado State after a successful playing career at the school. A former walk-on, he went on to earn a scholarship as a sophomore and played center for the team from 1979-82.

Adam Henry, 42, enters his sixth season as a NFL coach and first as the 49ers wide receivers coach. A veteran of 18 seasons coaching at the professional and collegiate levels, he joins the 49ers after three years (2012-14) as the wide receivers coach at Louisiana State University, where he helped develop two of the most successful receivers in school history - Odell Beckham Jr. and Jarvis Landry. Both Beckham and Landry finished their LSU careers ranked among the top-10 in school history in receptions and 100-yard games. Henry helped send three LSU receivers to the NFL following the 2013 season, Beckham was selected by the New York Giants in the first round (12th overall), Landry by the Miami Dolphins in the second round (63rd overall) and James Wright by the Cincinnati Bengals in the seventh round (239th overall). Prior to joining LSU, Henry spent two seasons as an offensive quality control coach (2007-08) with the Oakland Raiders, and coached their tight ends for the next three years (2009-11). Henry joined the Raiders after 10 years at his alma mater, McNeese State University (1997-06). He spent his first nine seasons on the staff as the wide receivers coach (1997-05) before being promoted to offensive coordinator in 2006. Prior to coaching, Henry was a wide receiver at McNeese State (1990-93). He earned All-Southland Conference honors in 1993 and finished his collegiate career with 93 receptions for 1,690 yards and 16 touchdowns, all of which remain in the top-10 in school history. Following his career at McNeese State, Henry signed a free agent contract with the New Orleans Saints in 1994. He spent the 1995 season on the team's practice squad, as well as the 1996 preseason.

Steve Logan, 61, enters his fourth season in the NFL and first as the 49ers quarterbacks coach. He reunites with 49ers head coach Jim Tomsula, after serving as his offensive coordinator with the NFL Europe's Rhein Fire, in 2006. A former college head coach and offensive coordinator, Logan is a veteran of 37 seasons coaching at the professional, collegiate and high school levels. He served as the running backs coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 2009-11. Prior to joining the Buccaneers, Logan spent two seasons as the offensive coordinator at Boston College (2007-08), where he tutored current Atlanta Falcons QB Matt Ryan. He arrived at Boston College after two seasons as quarterbacks/wide receivers coach with the Berlin Thunder of NFL Europe (2004-05) and one season as offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach on Jim Tomsula's 2006 Rhein Fire coaching staff. Before his time in NFL Europe, Logan served as the head coach of East Carolina University from 1992-2002, where he became the school's all-time winningest coach, and led the Pirates to five bowl games. During his tenure, QB David Garrard broke 28 school passing and offensive records and passed for more than 9,000 yards and rushed for more than 1,000 yards in his career.

Logan began his coaching career as an assistant coach at Union High School in Tulsa, OK, in 1974, after graduating from the University of Tulsa the year before. In 1980, he became the tight ends coach at Oklahoma State under head coach Jimmy Johnson. He moved to Hutchinson Junior College for two years, before taking the reigns as offensive coordinator at Tulsa from 1983-84. Logan then went to the University of Colorado in 1985, coaching the Buffalo running backs for two years before coaching the quarterbacks at Mississippi State University from 1987-89.

Tom Rathman, 52, is entering his 13th season as the team's running backs coach. He rejoined the 49ers in 2009, after serving the previous two seasons in the same capacity with the Oakland Raiders. The San Francisco rushing attack averaged 136.0 yards per game in 2014, fourth-best in the NFL, while the team also averaged 4.6 yards per carry, tied for the third-highest mark in the league. Prior to joining the Raiders, Rathman served as the running backs coach for the Detroit Lions from 2003-05. During his first coaching stint with the 49ers (1997-2002), San Francisco's rushing attack finished in the top-10 among NFL teams in five of the six seasons under his guidance, including top-ranked seasons in 1998 (159.0) and 1999 (130.9), to go along with a second-ranked unit in 2001 (140.3). Prior to his coaching career, Rathman played for nine seasons in the NFL as a fullback (1986-94). He entered the league as a third round pick by San Francisco, where he spent the first eight years of his career helping the 49ers capture two Super Bowl Championships (XXIII and XXIV) and seven NFC West titles. Rathman played his final season in the NFL with the Los Angeles Raiders in 1994, closing out his NFL career with 2,020 rushing yards, 320 receptions for 2,684 yards and 34 total touchdowns.

Tony Sparano, 53, enters his 17th season in the NFL and first as the 49ers tight ends coach. A former NFL head coach with 31 seasons coaching the game at the collegiate and professional levels, Sparano joins the 49ers having previously served as the assistant head coach/offensive line coach for the Oakland Raiders before being named the team's interim head coach early in the 2014 season. Prior to joining the Raiders in 2013, Sparano was the offensive coordinator for the New York Jets in 2012, following a four-year stint as head coach of the Miami Dolphins (2008-11). From 2008-10, Miami posted a 15-9 record on the road, which was tied for the third-best road record during that time span. A key member of the Cowboys coaching staff from 2003-07, Sparano held several offensive positions, including tight ends coach (2003-04), offensive line/run-game coordinator (2005) and assistant head coach/offensive line (2006-07). Prior to two, one-year stops as a tight ends coach with the Redskins (2001) and Jaguars (2002), Sparano helped re-launch the Cleveland Browns. In 1999, Sparano served as the Browns offensive quality control coach before spending the 2000 season in charge of the team's offensive line. Sparano made the jump to the NFL after five years as head coach of his alma mater, Division II New Haven (1994-98), where he compiled a 41-14 record (.745). A native of West Haven, CT, Sparano was the starting center at New Haven from 1979-82.

Eric Wolford, 43, enters his first season in the NFL as the 49ers assistant offensive line coach, after spending the previous 19 seasons in the collegiate ranks. Prior to joining the 49ers, he served as the head coach at Youngstown State University from 2009-14. In 2009, Wolford worked under Steve Spurrier at South Carolina as the running-game coordinator and offensive line coach. Prior to joining the Gamecocks, Wolford spent two seasons at the University of Illinois (2007-08), coaching the offensive line under then head coach Ron Zook. Over the course of 11 seasons (1996-2006), Wolford has served as the offensive line coach for other collegiate staffs, including the University of Arizona (2004-06), the University of North Texas (2003), the University of Houston (2000-02), the University of South Florida (1997-99) and Emporia State University (1996). He began his coaching career as a graduate assistant under Bill Snyder at Kansas State University, where he was a four-year starter at guard for the Wildcats.

D.J. Boldin, 28, is in his third season with the 49ers and his second as an offensive assistant after spending the 2013 season as a coaching assistant. Prior to joining the 49ers, Boldin spent the spring of 2013 coaching in the Professional Developmental Football League both as an offensive coordinator and wide receivers coach. Before his time as an assistant coach, Boldin played wide receiver at Wake Forest University, earning First-Team All-ACC honors after recording 81 receptions for 848 yards and three touchdowns during his senior season, in 2008. Boldin signed as an undrafted free agent with the Detroit Lions in 2009 and would later finish his playing career with the Toronto Argonauts (2010-12) of Canadian Football League.

DEFENSE

Eric Mangini, 44, is in his third season with the 49ers and first as the defensive coordinator. A former two-time NFL head coach, Mangini spent the 2014 season as the tight ends coach and the 2013 season as the team's senior offensive consultant. Throughout his 18 years as a NFL coach, he has been part of seven playoff teams, five division titles and three Super Bowl Championships. Prior to joining the 49ers, Mangini worked as an NFL analyst with ESPN following head coaching stints with the Cleveland Browns (2009-10) and the New York Jets (2006-08).

As the youngest head coach in the NFL in 2006, Mangini was named AFC Coach of the Year by the Kansas City Committee of 101 after taking a team that finished 4-12 the previous season and guiding them to 10 wins and a playoff appearance. He joined the Jets after six seasons with the New England Patriots, including five seasons as the defensive backs coach (2000-04) and one as the defensive coordinator (2005). Over his six seasons with the club, the Patriots ranked fifth in interceptions (109) and second in interceptions returned for touchdowns (16), while winning three Super Bowl Championships (2001, 2003-04). As the defensive coordinator in 2005, New England won 10 games and the AFC East despite having 45 different players make at least one start, an NFL record for a division champion.

Before joining the Patriots coaching staff, Mangini spent three seasons as a defensive assistant with the New York Jets (1997-99) and one season as an offensive assistant with the Baltimore Ravens (1996) during their inaugural season. He began his NFL coaching career with the Browns as a coaches' assistant in 1995, after serving as a ball boy and public relations intern with the team the previous year.

Scott Brown, 62, enters his fourth season in the NFL and first as the 49ers defensive line coach, having spent the past three seasons as the team's Midwest regional scout. A coaching veteran of 36 collegiate seasons, Brown has had stints as a defensive line coach at Arizona State University (2011) and Colorado State University (2008-10) after coaching the defensive line and special teams at Duke University from 1996-2007. Prior to his tenure at Duke, Brown spent four seasons at the University of Minnesota, where he tutored the defensive line (1992-94) and linebackers (1995). He also spent nine years at Texas Christian University (1983-91) and three at Southwest Texas State (1980-82), coaching the school's defensive lines. Brown began his coaching career in various roles at his alma mater, Adams State (1976-79), in Southern Colorado.

Tim Lewis, 53, enters his 21st season coaching in the NFL and first with the 49ers as the team's secondary coach. A former NFL defensive coordinator, Lewis has 28 years of coaching experience under his belt at the professional and collegiate levels. He joins the 49ers after spending the past five seasons as the secondary coach of the Atlanta Falcons (2010-14). Lewis joined the Falcons after one season (2009) as the defensive backs coach of the Seattle Seahawks and two seasons in the same role with the Carolina Panthers (2007-08). Before his time in Carolina, he was the defensive coordinator of the New York Giants for three seasons (2004-06). Lewis began his NFL coaching career as the defensive backs coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers (1995-99) before being named defensive coordinator for the next four years. He started his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Texas A&M University in 1987. Following two seasons with the Aggies (1987-88), Lewis spent four years as the defensive backs coach at Southern Methodist University (1989-92). After his time at SMU, he coached defensive backs for two seasons at the University of Pittsburgh (1993-94). Lewis was the 11th overall pick in the 1983 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers where he played four seasons (1983-86).

Clancy Pendergast, 47, is in his first season coaching with the 49ers as the team's linebackers coach. A former defensive coordinator at both the professional and collegiate levels, he has 23 years of coaching experience, including 16 seasons in the NFL. He most recently served as the defensive coordinator and secondary coach at the University of Southern California, in 2013. Prior to USC, Pendergast spent three years (2010-12) as the defensive coordinator at the University of California and one season as the Kansas City Chiefs defensive coordinator (2009). He joined the Chiefs coaching staff after five seasons as the defensive coordinator of the Arizona Cardinals (2004-08), where he helped the team to a berth in Super Bowl XLIII. Prior to his time in Arizona, Pendergast was the linebackers coach with the Cleveland Browns (2003). He spent seven seasons (1996-2002) with the Dallas Cowboys, helping the team win two NFC East titles (1996 and 1998) and earn three playoff appearances (1996, 1998-99). Pendergast was a defensive assistant and quality control coach during his first four seasons (1996-99), before overseeing Dallas nickel packages in 2000. He spent his final two seasons with the team coaching defensive backs (2001-02). Pendergast first joined the NFL coaching ranks in 1995 as a defensive assistant/quality control coach with the Houston Oilers. Pendergast began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at Mississippi State (1991) before becoming a defensive assistant at USC (1992). He was a graduate assistant/tight ends coach at the University of Oklahoma for two seasons from 1993-94.

Jason Tarver, 40, enters his 14th season in the NFL and first as the team's senior defensive assistant/linebackers coach, having served as a 49ers assistant coach from 2001-10. A former defensive coordinator at the professional and collegiate levels, he is a veteran of 19 coaching seasons. Tarver was the Oakland Raiders defensive coordinator from 2012-14, after spending the 2011 season as the co-defensive coordinator/inside linebackers coach at Stanford University. During his decade-long, first tenure with the 49ers, Tarver spent time as an offensive quality control coach (2001-03), assistant running backs/offensive assistant coach (2004) and outside linebackers coach (2005-10). Before joining the 49ers staff, Tarver spent three years as a graduate assistant with UCLA (1998-2000). He worked primarily with defensive backs, while also assisting with special teams. Tarver played football at West Valley Junior College in Saratoga, CA (1994-95), before coaching the team's linebackers, defensive backs and special teams for two seasons.

Ejiro Evero, 34, enters his fifth season with the 49ers and second as a defensive assistant. After joining the team in 2011 as a quality control coach, he spent two seasons as an offensive assistant in 2012-13 before transitioning to defensive assistant last year. Evero spent the 2010 season at the University of Redlands as the special teams coordinator and safeties coach after three seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2007-09) as the defensive quality control coach. Before joining the Bucs, he spent two seasons (2005-06) as an assistant coach at the University of California-Davis. In 2004, Evero was a football intern at UC-Davis, while also serving as an assistant coach for the Davis High School junior varsity squad. He was a four-year letterman at UC-Davis, starting at safety for three seasons. A two-time captain for the Aggies, he was twice named a Division II All-American (2002-03). Following his college career in 2004, he signed with the Oakland Raiders as an undrafted free agent.

Aubrayo Franklin, 34, is in his first season as a coach in the NFL and first as the team's defensive assistant, returning to the 49ers where he played defensive tackle from 2007-10. A former fifth-round draft pick in 2003, he also played for the Baltimore Ravens (2003-06), New Orleans Saints (2011), San Diego Chargers (2012) and Indianapolis Colts (2013). In his 11-year career, Franklin played in 142 games (94 starts) and registered 460 tackles, 4.0 sacks, three forced fumbles, one fumble recovery, one interception and nine passes defensed.

Lombardi, 26, enters his third season with the 49ers and his first season as a defensive assistant. He previously spent the 2014 season as an offensive assistant and the 2013 season as assistant to the head coach. Prior to joining the 49ers, Lombardi served as both a scouting assistant and coaching assistant for the New England Patriots, where his duties included evaluating players, breaking down film for the offense, assisting offensive coaches, running the scout team, and charting plays for the coaching staff. Lombardi was hired as a training camp intern in the scouting department for the Patriots in 2011, before being promoted to a full-time position prior to the regular season. Before his time in the NFL, Lombardi was a student assistant coach at Fordham University for the 2009 and 2010 seasons.

SPECIAL TEAMS

Thomas McGaughey Jr. (muh-GAY-hee), 41, enters his ninth season in the NFL and first with the 49ers as the team's special teams coordinator. Having served as a special teams coordinator at the professional, collegiate and high school levels, he is a veteran of 18 coaching seasons. He joins San Francisco's staff after spending the 2014 season as the New York Jets special teams coordinator. Prior to joining the Jets, McGaughey served as the special teams coordinator at LSU for three seasons (2011-13) following stints as the assistant special teams coordinator with the New York Giants (2007-10) and the Denver Broncos (2005-06). He spent two years working at the University of Houston (2003-04), following a two-year stint with the Chiefs as a minority coaching fellow (2001) and assistant special teams coach (2002). McGaughey worked as a pro scouting assistant with the Houston Texans (2001), after serving as the defensive backs and special teams coach for Willowridge (TX) High School (1998-2001). He began his coaching career as a graduate assistant at the University of Houston, following a four-year career at safety. McGaughey spent time in training camp with the Cincinnati Bengals in 1996, before joining the Philadelphia Eagles practice squad later that season. He went on to attend the team's training camp the following year. McGaughey was a member of a Barcelona Dragons team that won the NFL Europe World Bowl Championship, in 1997.

Richard Hightower, 34, enters his ninth year in the NFL and first with the 49ers as the assistant special teams coach. He joins the 49ers after spending the 2014 season as an offensive quality control coach with the Cleveland Browns. Prior to Cleveland, Hightower served as the assistant special teams coach with the Washington Redskins from 2010-13. He also spent two seasons (2012-13) as the assistant defensive backs coach. Before his time in Washington, he spent the 2009 season coaching wide receivers at the University of Minnesota. Hightower began his coaching career as an assistant with the Houston Texans from 2006-07, before being elevated to special teams assistant in 2008.