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Eric Rogers, DeAndre Smelter among intriguing inexpensive options at 49ers WR position

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We're running down the salary cap figures, and notable contract details for each position group. Today, we look at wide receivers.

The 49ers are working their way through OTAs, and as we continue prepping for the upcoming season, it seemed a good time for another swing through the positions. This time around, we are looking at the salary cap figures for the players competing in each position group. The 49ers have a ton of cap space, so it should not play a huge role in deciding roster spots, but it is always interesting to consider.

We are started off with quarterbacks and running backs, and now move on to wide receivers. We've got a list of the pertinent numbers for each player, and anything key points associated with the given contract. The 49ers rank ninth in cap dollars spent at the position, and 12th in percent of cap space spent.

Torrey Smith

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

Per Game RB

WO Bonus

2016

$7,600,000

$4,500,000

$1,600,000

$500,000

$1,000,000

2017

$9,600,000

$6,500,000

$1,600,000

$500,000

$1,000,000

2018

$9,600,000

$6,500,000

$1,600,000

$500,000

$1,000,000

2019

$9,600,000

$6,500,000

$1,600,000

$500,000

$1,000,000

Smith will likely be the 49ers number one receiver, barring a last minute deal for free agent Anquan Boldin. It's safe to say this is a big year for Smith to prove he was worth the $40 million contract he signed last year.

Smith’s 2016 base salary is guaranteed already, due to him being on the roster on April 1. His 2017 base salary is guaranteed for injury right now, and becomes fully guaranteed if he is on the 49ers roster on April 1, 2017. His 2018 base salary has a partial injury guarantee worth $2.25 million, and becomes fully guaranteed on April 1, 2018. There are no guarantees on his 2019 base salary.

Jerome Simpson

Year

Cap Hit

Base

WO Bonus

2016

$935,000

$885,000

$50,000

Simpson has one year left on his original two-year deal. The only dead money that he would leave if cut, would be his current $50,000 workout bonus. If Simpson makes the 53-man roster out of training camp, his 2016 base salary would be fully guaranteed. If he is cut and then signed back after week 1, he would get 25 percent of his base salary guaranteed.

Quinton Patton

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$772,875

$600,000

$97,875

This could be a make or break it year for Patton, who needs to step up, and produce, or he very well could be an odd man out after 2016. Patton can currently sign an extension at any time, but that will likely have to happen if/when he produces in Chip’s offense.

Patton is elgibile for the PPE, better known as the Proven Performance Escalator in his final season.

Bruce Ellington

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$718,607

$600,000

$118,607

2017

$808,607

$690,000

$118,607

Ellington brings great speed and versatility to Chip Kelly’s offense. He needs to produce if he wants to remain in the 49ers long term plans. Ellington will be eligible for an extension after the 2016 season. Ellington is also eligible for the PPE, better known as the Proven Performance Escalator. It is described in detail at the bottom of the article.

Eric Rogers

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

WO Bonus

2016

$537,500

$450,000

$62,500

$25,000

2017

$602,500

$540,000

$62,500

$0

Rogers was signed from the CFL, and his combination of size and speed make him a perfect fit for Chip Kelly’s offense. He also signed a very cap friendly two-year deal, which only included $225,000 guaranteed. Rogers is expected to compete for a starting spot opposite Torrey Smith.

DeAndre Smelter

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$536,422

$450,000

$86,422

2017

$701,422

$615,000

$86,422

2018

$791,422

$705,000

$86,422

Smelter is coming off a season where he was on the NFI list all year due to a torn ACL he suffered his final year of college. Like Rogers, he is expected to compete for a starting spot opposite Smith. Smelter is also eligible for the PPE, better known as the Proven Performance Escalator. If he plays out his contract, he will be a restricted free agent instead of unrestricted due to his NFI season.

DeAndrew White

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$527,333

$525,000

$2,333

2017

$617,334

$615,000

$2,334

White seems like a long shot right now, especially with the 49ers having so many players ahead of him on the depth chart. Plus, they added Aaron Burbridge in the 2016 draft, and added Devon Cajuste, and Bryce Treggs as undrafted free agents. White signed a three-year deal last year, which is the maximum allowed for an undrafted free agent.

Aaron Burbridge

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$475,089

$450,000

$25,089

2017

$565,089

$540,000

$25,089

2018

$655,089

$630,000

$25,089

2019

$745,089

$720,000

$25,089

Burbridge was very productive at Michigan State, where he caught just about everything thrown his way this past year. He is expected to compete with Patton and Elington for playing time in the slot. Burbridge would be eligible for an extension after the 2018 season. Burbridge will also be eligible for the Proven Performance Escalator in his final season.

Devon Cajuste

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$453,333

$450,000

$3,333

2017

$543,333

$540,000

$3,333

2018

$633,334

$630,000

$3,334

Cajuste was signed as a undrafted free agent out of Stanford immediately after the 2016 NFL Draft concluded. As I learned on Wednesday, he received a $10,000 signing bonus, and had $15,000 of his 2016 base salary guaranteed. With such a high amount of guaranteed money, Cajuste is a strong bet for making the 2016 practice squad, if not the 53-man roster. Cajuste would be eligible for an extension after the 2017 season.

Bryce Treggs

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$452,666

$450,000

$2,666

2017

$542,666

$540,000

$2,666

2018

$632,668

$630,000

$2,668

Treggs received a $8,000 signing bonus as an undrafted free agent out of California. He is one of several players working as a return man this offseason, so he has a good shot of making the 2016 roster if he impresses in that opportunity. Treggs would be eligible for an extension following the 2017 season.

Dres Anderson

Year

Cap Hit

Base

SB

2016

$452,000

$450,000

$2,000

2017

$617,000

$615,000

$2,000

Anderson is coming off a year where he was on injured reserve the entire season. He is likely long-shot to make the roster, but there is the possibility of 10-man practice squad. Anderson would be eligible for an extension after the 2016 season, if he makes the 2016 roster.

DiAndre Campbell

Year

Cap Hit

Base

2016

$450,000

$450,000

2017

$540,000

$540,000

Campbell is probably the player with the longest odds of making the 2016 roster, and he will cost nothing if released, unlike the rest of the 49ers receivers.

Here is how the proven performance escalator (PPR) works, according to the CBA:

The CBA states that an eligible player will qualify for the PPE in his fourth League year if: (1) he participated in a minimum of 35% of his Club's offensive or defensive plays in any two of his previous three regular seasons; or (2) he participated in a "cumulative average" of at least 35% of his Club's offensive or defensive plays over his previous three regular seasons. "Cumulative average" means the sum of the total number of offensive or defensive plays in which the player participated over the applicable seasons, divided by the sum of the Club's offensive or defensive plays during the same seasons. (By way of example, if a player participates in 600 of the Club's 1,000 offensive plays in his first season, 290 of the Club's 1,000 plays in his second season, and 310 of the Club's 1,000 plays in his third season for a total of 1,200 plays out of a possible 3,000, the cumulative average would equal 40%). As far as the salary is concerned, the PPE shall equal the difference between (i) the amount of the Restricted Free Agent Qualifying Offer for a Right of First Refusal Only as set forth in, or as calculated in accordance with, Article 9 for the League Year in such player's fourth season and (ii) the player's year-four Rookie Salary (excluding signing bonus and amounts treated as signing bonus). The resulting amount shall be added to the stated amount of the player's year-four Paragraph 5 Salary. Lastly If you have any questions, please leave them below, and I will do my best to get to them all.

As always you can follow me on Twitter, @Jay_AB81, or check our salary cap section here, on Niners Nation, which is now officially the exclusive home for my salary cap information.