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Everything you need to know for day 3 of the NFL Combine on-field workouts

We highlight and profile the 2019 NFL draft-eligible defensive lineman and linebacker prospects taking the field today for their on-field workouts at the NFL Combine on Day 3.

NCAA Football: Ohio State at Texas Christian Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

We have reached Day 3 of the 2019 NFL Scouting Combine. Today the defensive lineman and linebackers take the field. This could be the most important day of the combine for the San Francisco 49ers. Finding a premium pass rusher is priority number one for the 49ers and today will offer them an opportunity to see many of the top prospects up and close. The 49ers own the number two overall selection, and will have their pick of the blue-chip prospects and elite talent. Linebacker is another position the 49ers will be looking at closely. Finding someone long-term to pair with Fred Warner would be very beneficial and rewarding for the defense moving forward.

Who are YOU excited to see in action on day 3? Please share in the comments below!

2019 NFL Combine

Location: Indianapolis, IN | Lucas Oil Stadium
Time: 7:00 AM PT
Channel: NFL Network
Live Stream: NFL.com
Day 3: Defensive Lineman & Linebackers.

Niners Nation writer Josh Eccles gave a wonderful explanation of the workouts and drills in his article on Friday. As a reminder, here is a short list of those workouts and drills:

40-yard dash
Vertical Jump
Broad Jump
Shuttle Run
Bench Press
10 yard split
3 cone drill
20 yard shuttle
60 yard shuttle

Defensive Linemen:

How the measurable drills translate for defensive lineman:

When looking at the defensive lineman perform their drills today, keep in mind of some minimum measurable targets defensive lineman should be expected to target as a minimum result. For the most part, prospects exceeding these minimal targets tend to find success in the NFL.

Defensive Tackles:

40-yard dash - Minimum Target: 5.15

10-yard split - Minimum Target: 1.80

Vertical jump - Minimum Target: 30”

Broad jump - Minimum Target: 8’9”

3 cone drill - Minimum Target: 7.75

20-yard shuttle - Minimum Target: 4.55

Bench press - Minimum Target: 26

Flying-20 - Minimum Target: 2.13

Defensive Ends:

40-yard dash - Minimum Target: 4.85

10-yard split - Minimum Target: 1.70

Vertical jump - Minimum Target: 33”

Broad jump - Minimum Target: 9’9”

3 cone drill - Minimum Target: 7.35

20-yard shuttle - Minimum Target: 4.30

Bench press - Minimum Target: 24

Flying-20 - Minimum Target: 2.13

As for the drills themselves in relation to predicting future success, there is not an exact science on which drill equates to NFL success; however, specific drills for each position tend to garnish more importance than other drills. For the defensive tackles and defensive end positions, measurable drills aiding future success are: broad jump, 10-yard split, and the flying-20. For the smaller defensive ends (edge rushers/Leo), measurable drills aiding future success are: 40-yard dash, 10-yard split, 3 cone, flying-20, and the broad jump. (*The flying-20 is the measured last 20 yards of a 40-yard dash measuring separation speed.)

Defensive linemen prospects to watch:

DL25 Nick Bosa – Ohio State
Height: 6’4” – Weight: 266
Hands: 10 ¾” – Arms: 266”

NCAA Football: Ohio State at Texas Christian Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

Until I hear otherwise, Bosa is the number one overall rated prospect in this draft class. His rare play strength and physical measureables are exactly what scouts seek at the next level. His ability to extend and press along the edge is a sight to see. Constantly took on and handled double-team coverage along the line. Keeps his pad levels low and drives with force, utilizing his lower-body strength. Strong hands to break off blockers and the speed to come around the edge and create pocket pressure. Keeps his eyes and focus on the ball and anticipates where the play is going to occur. Bosa is a blue-chip, plug and play week 1 starter. He is a no brainer to go number one overall. So, what does that mean for the 49ers at number two overall? Well, perhaps the Cardinals love for Kyler Murray will continue to grow. Stranger things have happened.

DL19 Quinnen Williams – Alabama
Height: 6’3” – Weight: 303
Hands: 9 5/8” – Arms: 303”

NCAA Football: College Football Playoff National Championship-Clemson vs Alabama Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

Quinnen Williams was a relentless force along the defensive line for the Alabama Crimson Tide this season. Has an outstanding first step and initial burst off the snap. Has a high motor and uses his hands to generate power and push blockers into a backwards pedal along the line of scrimmage. Williams has a variety of rush moves and techniques that he utilizes effectively throughout the duration of a game. This can cause blockers to get off balance. Williams often requires double team attention (which doesn’t often stop him), which allows his fellow defensive lineman to find holes and gaps to create disruption and breakup plays, particularly on passing downs. Williams plays with a physical, bull-rush mentality. His speed and athleticism are off the charts. Explodes out of his stance and makes initial contact immediately. Will often win the one to one matchup, and uses his physical strength to his advantage.

Williams has a natural blend of power and flexibility. Gifted with strong football instincts and anticipation. There is a little concern about his length, particularly his arms. However, his handwork technique has been clean and superb throughout the course of the season. Forget that he is a redshirt sophomore…Williams was asked to switch to nose tackle, and so, has been performing at this elite level out of his natural position. Overall, Williams has incredible body control, devasting speed, and overwhelming strength who is a threat on every down he plays. Williams is a Top 5 lock in 2019 NFL Draft.

DL12 Ed Oliver – Houston
Height: 6’2” – Weight: 287
Hands: 9 ¼” – Arms: 28.7”

NCAA Football: Houston at Navy Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

Oliver was an absolute force on the Cougars defensive line in 2018. No other lineman dealt with more double team and even triple team coverages than Oliver. Oliver does an incredible job winning the first contact. Will fight and play through gaps at an elite level. Oliver has a high motor and is explosive off the ball. Has exceptional flexibility and is constantly creating disruption and chaos in the opponent’s backfield. Is able to follow through tight angles, while twisting his body and adjust his frame when rushing the passer. Many times, Oliver was fighting through initial contact with ease against blockers along the line of scrimmage. Breaks up plays well with his hands, throwing up his arms in passing lanes. Oliver has a natural blend of speed and power up the middle. Because of all the attention he requires, Oliver creates positive opportunities for his teammates along the line. I expect this will continue for Oliver when he settles at the pro level. Oliver has a bright future in the NFL and I’ll be shocked if he slips outside the top fifteen.

Sleepers:

DL24 Ben Banogu – TCU
Height: 6’3” – Weight: 250
Hands: 9” – Arms: 250”

NCAA Football: Iowa State at Texas Christian Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

The senior out of TCU has a long and athletic frame, with physical traits that scouts and evaluators seek at the next level. Will often play the left defensive end spot in a 4-3 base. Has an explosive burst and motor off the snap and can attack from the point along the edge against ball carriers on running plays. His long and lanky arms push against blockers along the line, which at times allows Banogu to burst through gaps and create disruption in the opponents’ backfield. Can shift his body and alter his pace that can throw offensive lineman off balance and out of position. As a pass rusher, Banogu has the ability to change direction to get around blockers. Trusts his speed to beat blockers along the edge. Has proficient lateral quickness, while using space to his advantage on passing downs.

DL26 Jordan Brailford – Oklahoma State
Height: 6’3” – Weight: 252
Hands: 9 1/8” – Arms: 252”

NCAA Football: Baylor at Oklahoma State Tim Heitman-USA TODAY Sports

The versatile athlete out of Oklahoma State was a big factor in the Cowboy’s defense this season. Brailford played at both defensive end spots and at three linebacker spots while he was at Oklahoma State in his collegiate career.. Has good size and measurables for the next level. He has the ability to reach on the pass rush, and can line up in a 3-point stance or as a stand-up outside linebacker. Demonstrates good burst and a quick first step off the snap. At times Brailford can be off balance, and can be one dimensional on rushes against the pass. While I do like his straight-line speed in pass rushing situations, his lateral quickness leaves a little be desired. On tape, Brailford demonstrates his ability to utilize active swipes against blockers. Overall, there is a lot to like about Brailford. I like his ability to play multiple positions on the field. An ability I believe most teams are looking for at the pro level. At the moment I see Brailford as an early day three pick who could potentially sneak into the backend of the second day of the 2019 NFL Draft.

Linebackers:

How the measurable drills translate for linebackers:

When looking at the linebackers perform their drills today, keep in mind of some minimum measurable targets linebackers should be expected to target as a minimum result. For the most part, prospects exceeding these minimal targets tend to find success in the NFL.

Inside Linebackers:

40-yard dash - Minimum Target: 4.80
10-yard split - Minimum Target: 1.70
Vertical jump - Minimum Target: 33”
Broad jump - Minimum Target: 9’6”
3 cone drill - Minimum Target: 7.20
20-yard shuttle - Minimum Target: 4.20
Bench press - Minimum Target: 24
Flying-20 - Minimum Target: 2.02

Outside Linebackers:

40-yard dash - Minimum Target: 4.70
10-yard split - Minimum Target: 1.65
Vertical jump - Minimum Target: 36’0
Broad jump - Minimum Target: 9’9”
3 cone drill - Minimum Target: 7.10
20-yard shuttle - Minimum Target: 4.10
Bench press - Minimum Target: 23
Flying-20 - Minimum Target: 2.01

As for the drills themselves in relation to predicting future success, there is not an exact science on which drill equates to NFL success; however, specific drills for each position tend to garnish more importance than other drills. For the inside linebacker position, measurable drills aiding future success are: 10-yard split and the vertical jump. For edge rushers/outside linebackers, measurable drills aiding future success are: 40-yard dash, 10-yard split, flying-20, 3 cone, and the broad jump.

Linebacker prospects to watch:

LB03 Josh Allen – Kentucky
Height: 6’5” – Weight: 262
Hands: 8 ¾” – Arms: 262”

NCAA Football: Citrus Bowl-Kentucky vs Penn State Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

Allen has a relentless motor and ability to attack from the edge. Allen has a natural bend of burst, length and flexibility who is able to put a tremendous amount of stress and pressure on offensive tackles. I absolutely love his range and abilities to make and finish plays that are extended well beyond the pocket and outside the numbers. Plays with constant urgency and will not let up as the game carries on. Allen is loose and fluid in his hips which helps with his initial burst and feet in motion. Lastly, his versatility is second to none, having been tasked to take on multiple responsibilities throughout the course of the season. Josh Allen is a day one, blue-chip selection who is a top ten lock in the 2019 NFL Draft.

LB41 Devin White – LSU
Height: 6’0” – Weight: 237
Hands: 9 ¾” – Arms: 237”

NCAA Football: Fiesta Bowl-Louisiana State vs Central Florida Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

White is an elite playmaking linebacker who is a first-round lock in next year’s draft. This season White had 115 tackles, 3 sacks, 2 forced fumbles, and 5 passes deflected. White has great speed for his position, covering a lot of ground, and defending the perimeter well against the run. White is a versatile linebacker who can defend against both the run and the pass in coverage. On tape, White has demonstrated his ability to break up plays for a loss of yardage behind the line of scrimmage. Finishes most of his tackles, while quickly wrapping his opponent and bringing them to the ground. White has above average flexibility with the ability to cut through and slip by blockers in his attempts to rush the passer. While I like White’s speed, he is not the most explosive linebacker off the initial snap. His aggressive tendencies can be inconsistent and doesn’t play every down up to his capabilities. Those are few and far in-between of course. There is so much to like about Devin White, and all that he brings to the position.

LB42 Mack Wilson – Alabama
Height: 6’1” – Weight: 240
Hands: 9 ¼” – Arms: 240”

NCAA Football: SEC Championship-Alabama vs Georgia Jason Getz-USA TODAY Sports

Anybody ready for another Alabama linebacker? Mack Wilson had a successful junior season with 63 tackles, 1 Sack, 1 Interception, and 5 passes deflected. Wilson, like most bama linebackers before him play a physical brand of football. Plays tough against blockers and trusts his strong and reliable hands. Has good down-hill speed and produces a positive push along the line of scrimmage. Has great range and instincts in coverage and in open space. Plays at his highest ability defending against the run. Has a natural initial burst and is explosive, with a high motor. From his straight-line to horizontal speed, Wilson just might be one of the fastest if not the fastest linebacker in the country.

Sleepers:

LB33 Germaine Pratt – N.C. State
Height: 6’2” – Weight: 240
Hands: 9 1/8” – Arms: 240”

NCAA Football: North Carolina State at Notre Dame Matt Cashore-USA TODAY Sports

The senior out of N.C. State recorded 114 tackles, 6 Sacks, 1 forced fumble, and 3 passes deflected. The high volume, three-down, linebacker has had a fine senior season and is quickly gaining the attention of scouts and evaluators. Overall, I think there is a lot of NFL upside when you watch the tape on Pratt. The crazy part about Pratt’s story is that he didn’t start one game last season, playing behind seniors, and only making appearances as a rotational linebacker. Pratt has the abilities to stop the run and have a positive impact in pass coverage. A converted safety, Pratt has natural, quick feet with great speed and bust, who can change direction on a dime and defend along the edge against ball carriers and take on tight ends in man to man coverage up the middle. Pratt is successful defending in space and while in pass coverage.

DL13 Deshaun Davis – Auburn
Height: 5’11” – Weight: 234
Hands: 10” – Arms: 234”

NCAA Football: Auburn at Clemson Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

One of the leaders of the Auburn defense last season was senior Deshaun Davis. Plays to his strength and brings power on the initial contact to bring his opponent to the ground quickly. Davis is a volume tackler. Does not hesitate to take on blockers, lowering his shoulder, moving into forward motion towards the line of scrimmage. Davis needs to work more on his hand technique when trying to break down blockers. Playing along the second level of the field, Davis likes to play a physical brand of football. Has an average, but not great motor. However, he gives it his all on every play, and does not let up for a second, especially when running downhill against ball carriers on running downs.